The Old man and the sea

on

There is an old fisherman, Santiago, in Cuba who has gone eighty-four
days without a catch. He is "thin and gaunt with deep wrinkles in the
back of his neck,…and his hands had deep-creased scars from handling heavy
fish on the cords. But none of these scars were fresh. They were as old as
erosions in a fishless desert". Santiago’s lack of success, though, does
not destroy his spirit, and he has "cheerful and undefeated" eyes. He
has a single friend, a boy named Manolin, who helped him during the first
forty days of his dryspell. After forty days, though, Manolin’s parents
decide the old man is unlucky and order their son to join another boat. Despite
this, though, the boy helps the old man to bring in his empty boat every day.

I’ve red it in french, but this sample from the original writing shows so much great deals with Hemingway “Chef d’oauvre”.

"There
isn’t any symbolism. The sea is the sea. The old man is an old man. The boy
is a boy and the fish is a fish. The shark are all sharks no better and no
worse. All the symbolism that people say is shit. What goes beyond is what
you see beyond when you know."
Ernest Hemingway, 1952

The Hemingway’s text is so prgmatic and direct no need to check for the behind og the well just relax as see it as it’s shown in the light. If you step into reading the nevel you’ll never be able to deliver yours thoughts from your whole life, the real meaming of life is to understand it as it is, no need to argue, no need to comment somthing uncommentable.

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. wadid says:

    The story inspirated many producers.And there is at least one film (The old man and the sea) which i advise you to watch.
    I have the english version of the story written in old english. (in .PDF) if you want.

  2. Karim says:

    You should mail it asap

  3. karim says:

    can yoy sent to me the novel of the old man and the sea as short story …with my best wishes

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